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How To Make An Open Relationship Work

on Wednesday, 16 May 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

Complex Like any relationship, open unions don’t follow stringent guidelines. But when venturing into non-traditional territory, something like a rule book is more necessary than not. “Set the ground-rules for what actions and behaviors are allowed and disallowed under your open arrangement,” Courtney Clemen, founder of The V. Club, tells Complex. “It’s very important to think through all the scenarios and circumstances that could arise.” Couples should have a crystal clear understanding of what they are permitting each other to do, because the concept of sex is a broad spectrum and what’s OK and what’s not is subjective. Having agreeable rules ultimately minimizes feelings of insecurity, fear, and jealousy that can arise in an open relationship.

A Call to Action on June 1st—The First Ever Sex Worker Lobby Day

on Tuesday, 15 May 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, NCSF News

The National Coalition for Sexual Freedom urges everyone in our communities to join us in supporting the first ever Sex Worker Lobby Day on June 1st in Washington, D.C. NCSF will be participating with sex workers in Federal lobbying with Members of Congress. We are also supporting direct action activities that are planned around the country on June 1st and June 2nd.

The recently enacted FOSTA-SESTA laws have directly impacted many people because of the effect on sexual content on the Internet, with platform providers already removing sexual content for fear of criminal prosecution. Sex workers, in particular, have been placed in even more serious danger by the harmful effects of these laws.

All of us want to protect victims of sex trafficking. However, this legislation does not protect victims of sex trafficking and actually places them at greater risk by making it more difficult for them to access sex worker advocacy groups to get help.

The Sex Worker Lobby Day in Washington D.C. is a great opportunity for individuals to discuss important sexual freedom issues with their elected Members of Congress. It is also an opportunity to learn how to advocate to legislators. Lobbying is not a complex or difficult process. With a little training, anyone can do it and we will provide that training. You also don’t have to be out as kinky or a sex worker to join in.

For those of you who have not done lobbying before, this is truly a fascinating experience. You will enjoy it. But more importantly, this is an opportunity for you to make a real difference on issues that affect all of us and that are critically important for sex workers.

For additional information on how to sign up for Sex Worker Lobby Day in Washington D.C., contact Judy Guerin at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call her at 202-494-9555. For additional information on direct actions and activities planned around the country and in Washington D.C., visit www.survivorsagainstsesta.org.

sex workers June 2 Rally

BDSM and consent: How to stop rough sex crossing the line into abuse

on Monday, 14 May 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

BBC News

"Consent should be freely given, and it should be reversible at any point," said Ms Martin, who is also executive director of the World Association of Sex Coaches. "Many people think that if you consent, that you agree until it's done, but that's not at all how it's done."

How to Have BDSM Sex That's Safe and Consensual

on Sunday, 13 May 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

Life Hacker

Here are some important consent ground rules to follow:

Your partner must clearly affirm their desire to engage in sexual activities with you. In other words, a lack of a “no” is not a “yes.”

Your partner must consent to every single activity that you engaged in together. Saying “yes” to having intercourse doesn’t imply that someone is also saying “yes” to being slapped in the face.

I like using the term “enthusiastic consent,” which means that not only is your partner willing to engage in these activities with you, but they’re also excited about it.

Your partner consents willingly, without pressure or coercion.

Consent can be revoked at any time.

Guest Blog: Polyamory and BDSM researchers need your help!

on Friday, 11 May 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, NCSF News

by Chris Deaton
 

We are two graduate researchers out of Arizona State University who are working on BDSM related projects and are looking for additional input from the community. The projects have multiple phases depending on respondent’s status and desire for additional involvement.

 

There is a survey for the polyamorous community looking at various subculture intersections and some basic relationship structure and behavior information. There is also an additional interview component open to polyamorous couples that have been together for more than 10 years. There is a limited amount of participants allowed for this phase and it is focused on two distinct groups; self-identified BDSM members and those that are not. We want to know what you think makes you successful!

 

More information and the survey can be found at can be found at http://polyamory.education.

 

The second project is related to the intersection of BDSM and yoga and the benefits of each. The project is looking at the perceived benefits of both yoga and BDSM; specifically, improved body image, reduced anxiety and depression, and altered states of consciousness. There is an additional interview component open to women who have been practicing yoga and/or BDSM for 2 years or more. 

The survey and contact information can be found at http://links.asu.edu/yogabodysurvey.

Was it assault or kinky sex, Eric Schneiderman? Here's the difference

on Wednesday, 09 May 2018. Posted in NCSF in the News!, Front Page Headline, Media Updates

The Guardian

by Susan Wright

This Monday, Eric Schneiderman resigned as the New York attorney general after four women alleged that he had assaulted them. Two of the women claimed they had been “choked and hit repeatedly by Mr Schneiderman”, while another said she had been “violently slapped across the face”. A fourth woman alleged similar experiences.

In a statement issued on Monday, Schneiderman disputed the allegations, and seemed to imply that what had happened was part of kinky, rough sex: “In the privacy of intimate relationships, I have engaged in role-playing and other consensual sexual activity. I have not assaulted anyone. I have never engaged in nonconsensual sex, which is a line I would not cross.”

As a member of the BDSM community, I think its important to clarify the difference between rough sex and assault. In today’s post-50 Shades world, we all know there are many people who enjoy kinky sex and they like being called names or roleplaying. So you can’t judge the difference between rough sex and assault based on the behavior itself. The way you determine the difference is consent.

So the first step is to get specific agreement that this particular thing sounds hot and sexy and everyone involved wants to give it a try. Kinky people love to talk about what they want to do to each other. That’s our foreplay and we know the anticipation adds to the fun. But talking about what you like to do together is just the beginning. ...

Eric Schneiderman, Consent and Domestic Violence

on Wednesday, 09 May 2018. Posted in NCSF in the News!, Front Page Headline, Media Updates

NY Times Consent, the Dividing Line There is a bright line between pain caused by unwanted sexual or domestic violence and pain that can come during some kinds of consensual sexual activity among willing participants. “If it’s not consensual, then it’s not ‘rough sex.’ It’s abuse,” said Susan Wright, the founder of the National Coalition for Sexual Freedom, an advocacy organization for a diverse range of sexualities and sexual preferences. Consent should be given early and often, she said. Limits, risks and how to stop sexual activity should be discussed beforehand. And assumptions should never be made. “I know some people think it’s not sexy or spontaneous to actually talk about sex before you have it,” she said. “They’re absolutely wrong, because it’s the best foreplay in the world to talk about the things that turn you on and find out what things turn the other person on.” Even with consent, if sexual activity causes serious harm, it crosses the line to assault, she said.

Nico Tortorella Talks Polyamorous Marriage to Bethany Meyers: ‘We Allow Each Other Freedom’

on Tuesday, 08 May 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

US Weekly The All of It Is You: Poetry author noted that it’s “just trust.” He continued, “I mean we love each other more than anything and we allow each other freedom to explore ourselves. Before anything, we’re individuals and together we’re a unit and it’s unstoppable for us.”
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