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5 Ways to Ease Your Partner Into Trying Bondage and Kink

on Saturday, 29 September 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

SELF

I’m not suggesting you need to become a connoisseur of kink in order to give kink a try. What I am suggesting is that you do your research to help you understand what’s out there and to home in on what looks good to you. It will be easier to ask for what you want if you actually know what you want to try. If your partner asks, “Why does this appeal to you?” or “What do you want to do?” you should be able to provide a reasonable answer.

Tulane University Domestic Violence Guide

on Saturday, 29 September 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline

Tulane University School of Social Work

Not all violence makes the nightly news. In fact, although intimate-partner violence is common enough to be “the single greatest cause of injury to women” according to a report from the Domestic Violence Intervention Program, it often goes unreported and remains under-discussed. But the staggering statistics tell the real story: Every minute, an average of 20 people are physically abused by an intimate partner in the United States. That means over 10 million people—most of them women—are abused each year.

Permit issues delay SF leather plaza project

on Friday, 28 September 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

Bay Area Reporter

"I think at this point, with the supervisors knowing that we are preserving the historical site and actually creating an area that will be open for all community members South of Market, not just the leather and LGBTQ community but the neighborhood and its families, I am hoping that Supervisor [Rafael] Mandelman and the other supervisors are able to help us in the completion of it," said Sullivan, referring to the board's only LGBT member, who was elected in June to represent District 8, which includes the gay Castro district.

Guest Blog: What Therapists Need to Know About Consensual Non-monogamy

on Thursday, 27 September 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, NCSF News

By Heath Schechinger, Ph.D.

Too many clients who are in consensual non-monogamous (CNM) relationships have to educate their therapists. Too many of them discontinue therapy because their therapist judged them, didn’t know enough about CNM to be helpful, or worse, makes actively stigmatizing comments such as “polyamory isn’t stable,” “women can’t do non-monogamy,” or “we can’t accept you to our therapy group as you’re non-monogamous — you wouldn’t fit in.” These are real quotes from a study about the experiences of CNM clients in therapy a couple of colleagues and I recently had accepted for publication in Journal for Clinical and Consulting Psychology.

We believe our results clearly highlight how we need to start taking the mental health needs of the CNM community seriously. For context, around 4–5% of people in the United States report that they are in CNM relationships, a comparable number to how many people identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender. More than one in five adults have also tried CNM at some point, which is not far off from how many people own a cat. We also know that interest and awareness of CNM, especially open relationships and polyamory, is on the rise, despite evidence of blatant stigma directed toward this population.

It is still rare, however, for mental and medical health professionals to receive training on how to effectively support people who are engaging in or exploring consensual non-monogamy. Given what we know about minority stress causing additional mental health burdens, I am concerned about the lack of support this community is receiving.

As co-chair of the American Psychological Association’s Division 44 Consensual Non-monogamy Task Force, I’m calling for my colleagues to thoughtfully examine our assumptions around monogamy, pursue and promote education about relationship diversity, and approach this issue with the same level of respect and care that we do with other marginalized communities.

Results, Implications, and Calls to Action

In our study, Drs. John Sakaluk, Amy Moors, and I asked 249 people engaged in CNM about their experiences in therapy, making it the largest study to date on this topic. Significantly, the study was accepted at a top-tier, mainstream clinical journal, signaling that the field of psychology is starting to recognize the importance of addressing relationship diversity.

Monogamy is privileged. It is the unquestioned status quo, prompting many therapists to assume by default that their clients are monogamous, or even, for some, that their clients should be. The publication of this paper means that mainstream psychologists may read about and subsequently treat the needs of the consensual non-monogamy community with an elevated level of respect. The article also calls on mental health researchers and providers to examine our biases and take a nonjudgemental posture toward clients engaged in consensual non-monogamy — just as we would with LGBTQ clients.

We asked participants in structured and open formats what their therapist did (or did not do) that they found to be helpful and unhelpful, allowing us to generate broad and specific practice recommendations and calls to action.

Educating Therapists

One of the most prominent themes in our data was the importance of educating therapists about CNM. For example, our participants rated therapists as being more helpful when their therapists: (1) educated themselves about CNM issues; (2) held affirming, nonjudgmental attitudes toward CNM; (3) helped them feel good about being CNM; and (4) were open to discussing issues related to a client’s relationship structure. By contrast, CNM clients rated therapists as less helpful and were more likely to prematurely discontinue therapy when their therapist: (1) lacked or refused to gather information about CNM, (2) held judgmental, (3) pathologizing, and/or (4) dismissive attitudes toward CNM.

One-fifth of our participants also reported that their therapist lacked the basic knowledge of consensual non-monogamy issues necessary to be an effective therapist, and/or had to be constantly educated about CNM issues.

That is not to say all therapists were unaware of CNM. One-third of therapists in our study were described by CNM clients as quite knowledgeable of CNM communities and resources. We also asked in an open format what our participants’ therapists did that they found particularly unhelpful. One in five of those responding mentioned their therapist lacking or refusing to gather info about CNM.

It is important to note that our results may be inflated positively as nearly half of our participants reported intentionally seeking a therapist who was affirming toward CNM. Results were generally worse among those who did not search for a CNM-affirming therapist.

These results in conjunction with the size and stigma directed toward the CNM population has led me to conclude that educating therapists needs to be addressed at the highest levels of the mental health profession. It is time to include CNM in therapist training and continuing education programs, and I am calling on my colleagues to join me in advocating for this change.

Removing Barriers to Treatment

Being able to find a therapist who is educated and affirming of CNM is also a critical issue. CNM therapy clients who screened for a CNM-affirming therapist reported better treatment outcomes. They experienced more “exemplary” and fewer “inappropriate” therapy practices by their therapists, and they rated their therapists as being more helpful than those who did not search for a CNM-affirming therapist.

I am also requesting my colleagues advocate for CNM to be included as a search term on therapist locator websites (such as Psychology Today and APA Psychologist Locator) to help remove barriers to the CNM community accessing culturally competent care.

This is a step that I am pleased to announce that APA Psychologist Locator has agreed to take. We are currently in dialog with them about adding ‘Consensual Non-monogamy’ and ‘Kink/Diverse Sexualities’ as searchable categories, with the changes (hopefully) set to go live in November/December 2018. We hope Psychology Today and other therapist locators will follow suit. …

Resources & Getting Involved

One of our initiatives is to advocate for the eventual creation of practice guidelines, similar to those that were created by the American Psychological Association for working with lesbian, gay, and bisexual therapy clients as well as transgender and gender nonconforming therapy clients.

In an effort to progress toward practice guidelines, I developed empirically-informed benchmarks that can be used to assess practices at the institutional and individual levels. Dr. Michelle Vaughan also led the charge in creating informational brochures that people engaged in CNM can provide to their medical and mental health provider(s).

You can access the benchmarking tool, language for asking about relationship style on demographic forms, informational brochures, and join the APA Division 44 Consensual Non-monogamy mailing list by signing our petition to support relationship diversity in mental health, medical health, and the legal profession. Alternatively, you can receive these resources by simply joining the mailing list.

In addition to signing our petition and/or joining our mailing list, we would like to invite you apply to join our task force or follow us on Facebook and Twitter, where we will be posting updates. I will also be making updates on my Twitter, Facebook, and Linkedin accounts.

These resources and this post can be shared freely with your network as well as your current medical and mental health providers.

Educating therapists, removing barriers to accessing treatment, asking about relationship status on demographic forms, setting benchmarks, and signing petitions will not eliminate the judgment and discrimination experienced by the CNM community — but we believe these are all important steps forward. With education and exposure we can challenge the mononormative assumptions promoting a one-size-fits all model of relating — in the same way we challenge assumptions about sexual orientation and gender diversity.

Just as monogamy is not right for everyone, neither is consensual non-monogamy. It’s not about what’s right for all, but what’s right sized for the individual.

 

Heath Schechinger, Ph.D., is a licensed counseling psychologist at the University of California, Berkeley, and Co-chair of the American Psychological Association Division 44 Consensual Non-monogamy Task Force. His private practice specializes in providing support to the CNM, kink, queer, and gender non-conforming communities.

Fauxpologists like Jian Ghomeshi: How to Deal with Them

on Tuesday, 25 September 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

The Tyee

Here’s the thing. People who see a criminal court as the sole arbiter of fact are missing both the point and the truth. The legal system is not built to handle sexual assault, and consequently, only a tiny percentage of such cases ever result in a guilty verdict. The vast majority of sexual assaults are never reported at all, let alone end up in court. This isn’t because they didn’t happen. It’s because the system is set up to make it extremely hard for victims to win. From the myriad social factors that discourage reporting to wildly inconsistent policing to judges who don’t properly apply existing sexual assault laws or understand the effects of trauma, accusers are hampered at every step. The discrepancy between sexual assault statistics and court convictions tells us that the system is failing — not that sexual assaults don’t occur.

Sex talk: What even the most vanilla among us can learn from the BDSM community

on Thursday, 20 September 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

Little Village

How do we reframe our expectations so we are not constantly critical of ourselves or our partner? Let’s move away from who-does-what-to-whom and towards a curious and honest exploration of guiding principles that impact mindset. How do I get into the mindset of sex being a place we go, instead of what we do to each other? How do we explore our sexual appetite without anxiety or the pressure of an outcome?

Everything you need to know about using safewords

on Wednesday, 19 September 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

Cosmopolitan UK

"The cornerstone of any good relationship is good communication, and this is especially true during BDSM. Setting up a trusting environment with a new partner takes planning and mutual agreements and, perhaps most importantly of all, the ability to listen. You and your partner need to be equals for this talk."

Here's How a Therapist Coaches Couples Who Decide to Have Sex With Other People

on Tuesday, 18 September 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

Time

“I very rarely see that rules create security in these situations. How can we possibly anticipate all the possibilities? It’s an attempt to control, but it might make people feel more out of control,” he said. He told us that in his work with couples practicing CNM, he kept the focus on their attachment bond and let them come up with the rules without getting too involved in that himself. In his experience, he said, the rules might change or even fade out in time if the relationship security is sufficiently strong. “My job is to help people who have decided not to be monogamous keep turning back to each other if they feel insecure or flooded with fear. That way a negative becomes a positive. What might weaken or sink a relationship strengthens it.”

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