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Is Sex Addiction Real? Here’s What Experts Say

on Tuesday, 14 November 2017. Posted in NCSF in the News!, Front Page Headline, Media Updates

Time Magazine

By Amanda MacMillan

Is sex addiction real? It depends who you ask: Hollywood stars and industry heads who’ve cited it in defense of reported sexual indiscretions—ranging from infidelity to harassment to rape—may argue that it is. Over the last decade, celebrities including David Duchovny and Tiger Woods have famously sought treatment for sex addictions; more recently, Harvey Weinstein and Kevin Spacey have made similar announcements after accusations of misconduct.

 

Among scholars and medical experts, the consensus is less clear. And just this week, three non-profit organizations came out against the notion that sex or pornography can be “addicting,” saying the term can be misleading or even harmful to people seeking help for intimate issues.

 

The new position statement, drafted by the Center for Positive Sexuality (CPS), the Alternative Sexualities Health Research Alliance (TASHRA), and the National Coalition for Sexual Freedom (NCSF), is published this week in the online Journal of Positive Sexuality. It follows a similar statement last year from the American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors, and Therapists, which also spoke out against the idea of sex or porn addiction.

 

In their statement, the advocacy groups write that perceptions of sexual “addictions” may have more to do with people’s religious or cultural beliefs than of actual scientific data. The concept of sex addiction “emerged in the 1980s as a socially conservative response to cultural anxieties,” the authors wrote, “and has gained acceptance through its reliance on medicalization and popular culture visibility.”

 

The idea that people can be addicted to sex (or to porn) implies that people’s sex drives and erotic interests can be grouped into “normal” and “not normal,” the groups say, which could leave those with alternative sexual identities vulnerable to discrimination. It can also suggest that using sex or pornography as a coping mechanism is always a bad thing—when in fact, the statement argues, it may be perfectly healthy way to deal with stress and other problems.

 

These groups have the medical community at least partially on their side. Sex addiction is not recognized in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5), the reference guide for mental illnesses published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA). One reason for that is a lack of evidence that sexual behavior changes the brain the same way other addictive substances—like drugs and alcohol—do. ...

TSA sexually assaults me: When power enforces compliance

on Sunday, 05 November 2017. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

Huffington Post

by Ruby Bouie Johnson LCSW

"Compliance is not consent. Compliance is a product of coercion. Coercion is the leverage of power of social, economic, and status to manipulate, exploit, and deny another of the civil liberties and human rights. Acquiescing is not a sign of “asking for it.”

Facebook doesn't think my sexuality exists, and that needs to change

on Saturday, 04 November 2017. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

Mashable

"Yes, you can state that you’re in an Open Relationship, but I am not. I am as seriously and exclusively committed to two boyfriends as I would be to one. You can state that “It’s Complicated,” but in this case, and in many, many polyamorous relationships, it is not complicated. I love him, and I love him, both of them, more than anyone else."

I Went To Touchpoint, A Community Gathering For Talking About Sex, And Here's What I Learned From Complete Strangers

on Saturday, 04 November 2017. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

Bustle

"On the night I went to Touchpoint, the main topic that won the most votes was trust and transparency: What's the balance between honesty and personal privacy in a partnership? Over the two hours, people took turns swapping stories with the crowd, a diverse group of men and women in their 20s, 30s, and 40s. (One couple in attendance actually started dating after they met at Touchpoint.) We talked about everything related to relationship trust, from non-monogamous relationships to emotional cheating."

At the oral argument in the 9th Circuit on Oct. 19, Judge Carlos Bea asked a key question: “Why is it illegal to sell something that it’s legal to give away?”

on Saturday, 04 November 2017. Posted in NCSF News, Media Updates

Allure

And while being kinky still comes with social stigmas, Stephanie*, a 25-year-old woman involved in the New York City kink scene, says kinks are increasingly viewed as mainstream. “I always thought you couldn’t have an unconventional lifestyle and fall into success. Now I know you can live a kinky lifestyle and still be successful,” Stephanie says.

Why laws against prostitution are unconstitutional

on Saturday, 04 November 2017. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

The Sacramento Bee

At the oral argument in the 9th Circuit on Oct. 19, Judge Carlos Bea asked a key question: “Why is it illegal to sell something that it’s legal to give away?”

Adult Content Creators Are Fighting Patreon's New Anti-Porn Rules

on Saturday, 04 November 2017. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

Motherboard

Violet Blue, a journalist, author, and Patreon creator who also signed the letter, agreed. "They purposely positioned themselves as a progressive alternative to the discrimination faced by adult content creators," she told me in an email. "This instance is especially disgusting because Patreon is a bespoke Silicon Valley/San Francisco company who courted erotic artists in a city where erotic artists have literally been driven out thanks to companies like theirs, and now their hypocrisy will literally make erotic artists homeless by eliminating their livelihoods with a single keystroke, the burp of an algorithm, or a behind-closed-doors discussion of what porn is or isn't."

A Very Sexy Beginner's Guide to BDSM Words

on Saturday, 04 November 2017. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

GQ

A is for Aftercare

Aftercare is the practice of checking in with one another after a scene (or “play session,” a.k.a., the time in which the BDSM happens) to make sure all parties feel nice and chill about what just went down. The dominant partner may bring the submissive ice for any bruises, but it’s important to know that aftercare involves emotional care as well as physical. BDSM releases endorphins, which can lead to both dominants and submissives experiencing a “drop.” Aftercare can help prevent that. There’s often cuddling and always conversation; kinksters need love too.

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