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Recommended Reading

Recommended Reading

  Prepared by NCSF with input from GBLT Activists   POLICING PUBLIC SEX; edited by Dangerous Bedfellows; South End Press: Boston, Massachusetts; 1996 PUBLIC SEX, GAY SPACE; Edited by William L. Leap; Columbus University Press; 1999 THE QUEER QUESTION, ESSAYS ON DESIRE AND DEMOCRACY; Scott Tucker; South End Press; Boston, Massachusetts; 1997 SEXUAL POLITICS, SEXUAL COMMUNITIES; John D'Emilio; University of Chicago Press; 1983 THE PIG FARMER'S DAUGHTER AND OTHER TALES OF AMERICAN JUSTICE; EPISODES OF RACISM AND SEXISM IN THE COURTS FROM 1865 TO THE PRESENT; Mary Francis Berry; New York; Knopf; 1999 KISS AND TELL: SURVEYING SEX IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY; Julia Erickson, with Sally A. Steffen; Cambridge; Harvard University Press; 1999 SEX WARS: SEXUAL DISSENT AND POLITICAL CULTURE; Lisa Duggan and Nan Hunter; New York; Routledge; 1995 OPPOSITE SEX; GAY MEN ON LESBIANS, LESBIANS ON GAY MEN; edited by Sara Miles and Eric Rofes; NYU Press; 1998 THE TROUBLE WITH NORMAL; SEX, POLITICS, AND THE ETHICS OF QUEER LIFE; Michael Warner; Harvard University Press; Cambridge; 1999 THE POLITICS OF SEXUALITY; SEXUALITY & CULTURE; VOLUME 3; edited by Barry M. Dank and Roberto Refinetti; Transaction Publishers; New Brunswick 1999 AMERICAN SEXUAL BEHAVIOR; TRENDS, SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC DIFFERENCES, AND RISK BEHAVIOR; Tom W. Smith; National Opinion Research Center; University of Chicago; GSS Topical Report No. 25; Updated December, 1998 THINKING SEX; NOTES FOR A RADICAL THEORY OF THE POLITICS OF SEXUALITY; essay by Gayle S. Rubin; 1992 GLOBAL SURVEY 2000; GLOBAL SURVEY INTO SEXUAL ATTITUDES AND BEHAVIOR; Durex; 2000
17th Annual Symposium in San Diego, California on Aug 27, 1999   I. Who we are... why we are doing this   Introductions of Dr. Ruth W., neurologist, and Susan Wright, Policy Director of NCSF   We are presenting on "SM Issues for Healthcare Providers" because the same issues which may lead to inadequate health care for patients with non-mainstream sexual orientations or gender identity affect those who participate in sexual minority practices.   There are many questions related to physical or psychological health which patients may feel unable to ask because of fear of discrimination or of breach of confidentiality. As health care providers, we have a responsibility to be able to address these concerns without passing judgment.   An understanding of the basic principles of SM play enables us to fulfill this responsibility. In addition, it is important that we be able to identify when someone is in an abusive, non-consensual situation, and to provide them with appropriate support. This workshop will address the physical and psychological aspects of SM practices and provide an understanding of common scenarios.   II. Examples of questions Doctors may get   A 50 y/o man defers consulting his family physician about lower abdominal cramping associated with bowel movements because he is afraid the doctor will be able to tell he is into anal sex play and enemas, and that this may be related to his problem.   A 30 y/o woman gets a vaginal tear from fisting, which is continuing to bleed, but doesn't want to consult her doctor or got to the ER.   A 45 y/o man is left in bondage by a professional dominatrix for too long and develops numbness and weakness of both arms which does not resolve after a couple of days.   A 25 y/o woman newly diagnosed with MS is scared to explore her new interest in SM with her girlfriend, because she doesn't know how to ask her neurologist about what might be safe or dangerous for her to do.   The same issues which may lead to inadequate healthcare for patients with non-mainstream sexual orientation or gender identity affect those who participate in sexual minority practices. This includes gays, lesbians, bisexuals, folks who enjoy SM, who have body modifications such as piercings, tattoos, who crossdress, who are sex workers, who have multiple partners, who are transgendered or engage in fetish behavior.   There…
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Consent Counts: We're Making a Difference

  • Completed Federal and State Legal Research
  • Developed Educational Programs and Outreach Materials
  • Built Alliances With Sexual Freedom Advocacy Groups

About Consent Counts

NCSF is leading a major national campaign—Consent Counts—to change the laws and police practices that our communities now endure, and to establish that consent is available as a defense in criminal BDSM prosecutions.

  • BDSM is prosecuted as assault in the U.S., even when it is consensual.
  • No state or appellate court has allowed consent as a defense to assault in BDSM cases.
  • Consent Counts is a nationwide project to decriminalize consensual BDSM.
 
Program Goals:
Consent Counts
is a nationwide project to decriminalize consensual BDSM through education, advocacy, legal actions and lobbying.

 

Contact:
Judy Guerin
Director, Consent Counts 
 
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