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Journal of Positive Sexuality Gains Co-Sponsor in NCSF

on Tuesday, 01 March 2016. Hits 412

Non-Profit Outreach Education and Research Organization

Center for Positive Sexuality

is Pleased to Partner on Journal with National Coalition for Sexual Freedom!

LOS ANGELES (March 1, 2016) – On the heels of celebrating the one-year anniversary of their Journal of Positive Sexuality, launched in February 2015, the Center for Positive Sexuality teams up with the National Coalition for Sexual Freedom, a known champion of sexual freedoms and privacy rights for all adults. With similar visions, but slightly different audiences, the two groups' messages of sex positivity, consent, education, and acceptance can be shared more broadly.

Center for Positive Sexuality Director of Research Dr. DJ Williams reports, ”With this sponsorship the Journal will reach a wider audience and acquire more submissions to publish. This will also improve our research,as we’ll have an outlet to promote our studies and surveys. Partnering with NCSF makes sense. They have a broad audience who share similar interests.”

Established in 2007, the Center for Positive Sexuality received 501c3 Non-Profit status in 2013 and has been presenting educational panels to local colleges, universities, and professionals debunking myths and replacing them with truths and lived experiences on a range of issues such as kink/BDSM, non-monogamy, sex and aging, sex and disability, gender spectrum, and others.

The National Coalition for Sexual Freedom (NCSF) was formed in 1997 by a small group led by Susan Wright under the auspices of the New York SM Activists. The goal was to fight for sexual freedom and privacy rights for all adults who engage in safe, sane and consensual behavior. Today, NCSF has over 50 Coalition Partners made up of groups and businesses who serve BDSM, swing and polyamory practitioners. Over the years, NCSF has formed alliances with other organizations that defend sexual freedom rights: Free Speech Coalition, the ACLU, American Association of Sex Educators, Counselors and Therapists, Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality, National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, and the Gay and Lesbian Activist Alliance, among others.

In its first year of publication, the open-access Journal of Positive Sexuality published three issues with a total of 12 articles, reaching over 30 countries worldwide.

The Journal of Positive Sexuality is free to access and download, and is multi-disciplinary, peer-reviewed and easy to read (articles are no longer than 8 pages) all from a sex positive lens.

Survey by Dr. Michael Aaron

on Tuesday, 01 March 2016. Hits 770

Dear friends, colleagues, and community members:

For many clinicians in the mental health field as well as much of the lay public, those who engage in intense sensation play of BDSM (bondage and discipline, dominance and submission, sadism and masochism) are often co-mingled and conflated with behaviors of those who engage in self-harming behavior. As a result, individuals who belong to the BDSM subculture are often pathologized, as well as misunderstood in clinical settings, and so may find themselves without adequate psychological care.  In order to address this issue, we are conducting a study comparing the experiences and behaviors of those who engage/have engaged in intense sensation play in the context of kink/BDSM and those who engage non-suicidal self-injury.

We are inviting those who engage/have engaged in intense sensation play in the context of kink/BDSM and/or those who engage/have engaged in non-suicidal self-injury to participate in this survey.  Please click the link below to take the survey now, and feel free to distribute the link widely to friends, peers, colleagues, and/or groups.

 

Thank you in advance for your help!

 

 

Click here to take this survey!

If the above hyperlink does not work, copy and paste the following URL into your browser: https://uwstout.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_5q1GgTf9bUHeGy1

 

 

Detailed Description of Survey

TITLE: Differences between BDSM Participants and Individuals who Engage in Non-Suicidal Self-Injury

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael Aaron, Ph.D.

CO-PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS: Dulcinea Pitagora & Markie L. C. Twist (Blumer), Ph.D.

"How It Really 'Feels' To Be The Submissive Sex Partner"

on Monday, 29 February 2016. Hits 235

Huffington Post/50

by Sandra LaMorgese

Science fiction fans keen on Star Trek will know a different version of subspace than what we're talking about here, but, just like in the show, "subspace" in BDSM refers to a specific kind of space with its own rules, texture, and properties -- a kind of altered reality.

 

In BDSM, this altered reality usually takes place in the mind, although changes in the surrounding physical space can make a difference as well. This is why, for instance, people go out of their way to visit dungeons or set up private play rooms. These intentionally designed settings make it easier to get into the mood of an interaction -- to enter a psychological state where all the worries, cares, underlying thoughts, and emotions are stripped away, and your deepest, darkest fantasies can become reality.

 

When we're talking about "subspace," we're talking about the specific psychological state of mind that the submissive partner (or "sub") enters into during a scene with a dominant partner. To enter this subspace, the sub must be completely comfortable with the dominant partner, as they completely give up control to the "top" or "Dom/Domme" partner.

 

In many ways, getting into a subspace follows many of the same steps of practicing basic mindfulness, and is not nearly as strange as it may sound. Like with mindfulness, you have to be 100 percent present with your partner and in the moment. Many performers, musicians, and athletes use similar techniques to "get in the zone," where nothing exists except the experience itself.

 

Ever had a book you couldn't put down or a TV series you just had to finish, even if it meant an hours-long episode marathon? Subspace is the same. It's that feeling of utter presence, when all of your senses are heightened and your mind and emotions are totally wrapped up in the suspense of the moment. For the sub, entering subspace is an experience that melts away all their worries and fears. They don't have to think about anything or make any tough decisions.

 

All they need to do is obey and go with the flow.

 

On a psychological level, the point of this kind of exchange is to make the sub feel that the scene is real, thereby triggering their sympathetic nervous system into the "fight or flight" response. Tying them up, spanking, whipping, or flogging them may be part of this, as are later elements of pleasure such as the use of a vibrator or sensory play. Verbal putdowns, humiliation and begging are often part of the scene. Though it may seem intense, this sort of play is often tailored to match deep-seated fantasies that the sub harbors but has been unable to express outside of the emotionally safe space of the scene. ...

 

"What I Want Guys To Know About My Non-monogamy"

on Saturday, 27 February 2016. Hits 408

Refinery29

by SAMIA MOUNTS

Here’s how it normally goes down. I meet a guy who has something special in his face, a soulfulness that resonates with me. There’s this firecracker moment when our eyes connect for the first time and bing — we want each other.

 

It’s more than physical attraction; it’s spiritual, it’s deep, it’s something really real. We go out a few times, we have intense, intimate conversations into the wee hours of the night, and the kind of sex where you start seeing God. Everything’s going swimmingly for a few weeks or months, and then suddenly, he’s gone. Not completely gone, I’ll hear back from him if I contact him first and maybe even see him once in awhile, but he’s no longer making an effort. It’s inexplicable to me, because things were going so well. We were falling in love, and it was glorious. Why would anyone walk away from that?

 

I’m an attractive girl. I’m smart, funny, cool, self-sufficient. When I find guys who I’m only into for the sex, and vice versa, I can keep them enthusiastically coming back to me for years. The problem happens when I meet someone with whom I clearly feel the beginnings of a love connection. These guys, these real connections, are the ones I am most interested in developing long-term romantic affairs with — and they are also the ones who are the most freaked out by my assertion that I have no desire to be monogamous with them.

 

I don’t do monogamy. I’ve done it before, didn’t like it, never wanna do it again. And at this particular moment in my life, I’m not super stoked about relationships in general, since I’ve just come off of seven years of back-to-back relationships. I desperately need to be single for a while, so I can focus on all the things I want to do for a change.

 

But while I might be off relationships, I’m not off sex, and I’m certainly not off love. I want both of those things with cool, respectful, hot people who don’t need or want a commitment from me. You would think this would make me every man’s wildest dream — except it really doesn’t.

 

You see, as a practitioner of solo polyamory, a form of polyamory that means you have multiple romantic or sexual relationships, but no committed primary partner — I come with a certain level of upfront honesty. When I meet a new guy, I lead with this information, just to make sure they understand that, 'Yo, I ain’t ever gonna belong to you, dude. Be cool with that and we can hang! ' But what I’m finding over and over is that even the most commitment-phobic guys don’t like it when you close the door to a possible future commitment.

 

Why does this happen? Is it that shitty double standard that says men can sleep around and be praised for it, but women are met with slut-shaming and disrespect? Or is it because most people are inherently possessive of their lovers on a primal level? Or is it just basic fear and insecurity that makes men run from wild women? I’m thinking it’s probably a combination of these factors and more. Either way, it’s a pain in the ass. All I want is to have fun, respectful, passionate, loving relationships without monogamy or commitment, and I can’t seem to catch a break. ...

"Carmen Electra: ‘I like a little S&M"

on Friday, 26 February 2016. Hits 306

SF Gate

By Daily Dish

DAILY DISH

Carmen Electra: ‘I like a little S&M”

By Daily Dish on February 25, 2016 at 10:03 AM

4

 

Actress Carmen Electra attends the eighth annual Fighters Only World Mixed Martial Arts Awards at The Palazzo Las Vegas on February 5, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Gabe Ginsberg/Getty)

Actress Carmen Electra attends the eighth annual Fighters Only World Mixed Martial Arts Awards at The Palazzo Las Vegas on February 5, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Gabe Ginsberg/Getty)

Model and actress Carmen Electra has revealed she’s a fan of sadomasochism.

 

The sexy former wife of rocker Dave Navarro admits she likes a little pain and humiliation in her sex life in a candid chat with reality TV star-turned-U.S. talk show host Khloe Kardashian.

 

Chatting to Kim Kardashian’s sister on her “Kocktails With Khloe” show, she said, “I like a little S&M, I like a little hardcore.

 

“I actually have a cane… It just gives a slight sting… It was a gift that was given to me. Isn’t that sweet? So endearing… Sometimes I like to be dominant and sometimes I like to be dominated.”

 

Carmen also confessed to having “a little addiction” to porn, admitting her house cleaner often stumbles upon her racy secret when accidentally brushing the star’s keyboard. ...

NCSF Consent Summit

on Wednesday, 24 February 2016. Hits 3347

The NCSF Consent Summit is an all-day event of workshops and discussions on consent in Seattle. Attitudes are changing about consent, and it’s time to join in the conversation!

10am – 6pm on April 23rd @ the Center for Sex-Positive Culture, 1602 15th Ave W, Seattle, WA

Register here: https://www.strangertickets.com/events/31789308/ncsf-consent-summit

Download the program

Sponsored by the Seattle Erotic Arts Festival and the Foundation and Center for Sex-Positive Culture

tristan taorminoTristan Taormino will give the Keynote at the Luncheon from noon to 1 pm. Tristan Taormino is an award-winning writer, sex educator, speaker, filmmaker, and radio host. She is the editor of 25 anthologies and author of eight books, including The Ultimate Guide to Kink and The Feminist Porn Book: The Politics of Producing Pleasure. As the head of Smart Ass Productions, she has directed and produced twenty-four sex educational and erotic films. She is the host of Sex Out Loud, a weekly radio show on the VoiceAmerica Network.

Along with Tristan, other experts including Judge Rudy Serra, consent activist Kitty Stryker, Riddhi Mukhopadhyay, Brett Houghton, Sar Surmick, Jim Duvall, Judy Guerin, Kevin Carlson, Susan Wright and more will headline the Panel Discussions and Workshops:

* Consent & the Law
* Consent Activism: Past, Present and Future
* Affirmative Consent and College Campuses
* Negotiation & Consent
* Consent in Power Exchange Relationships
* Train the Trainers: How to educate about consent

Tickets:

$50 - All day event with luncheon ticket for Keynote
$40 - All day event without luncheon
$35 - All day reduced price and students
$30 - Luncheon and Keynote ticket
$75 – All day event with luncheon ticket and pay it forward*

*Pay it forward allows those who are economically advantaged to assist people who aren't. It's a reminder to all of us that money can create barriers between us. If you need a scholarship to attend, please contact NCSF to find out more - This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

All tickets include Seattle Erotic Arts Festival admission on Sunday and 15% off the Weekend Pass for the Seattle Erotic Arts Festival.

Register here

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Click to Download Flyer

"Sex work is safer online than on the street"

on Wednesday, 24 February 2016. Hits 390

Los Angeles Times

by Alison Bass

In early January, law enforcement in the Seattle area seized thereviewboard.net, a website where local sex workers posted advertisements and clients reviewed their services. In related police raids, people who ran and moderated the site were among those arrested and charged with promoting prostitution, a felony.
That was just the most recent salvo in what human rights advocates call an "ongoing war against sex" under the guise of fighting sex trafficking.
Last August, federal and state law enforcement officials in New York City shut down the gay escort site Rentboy.com and charged seven of its employees with promoting prostitution and laundering money. Earlier in 2015, the sheriff of Cook County, Ill., pressured MasterCard and Visa to stop processing financial transactions for backpage.com, a classifieds site, because it published ads for sex workers. (Backpage has since sued the sheriff.) And in 2014, federal authorities shut down myRedbook.com, a California-based site that allowed sex workers to post ads and share tips about doing sex work safely.
These closures represent a crusade to stamp out advertising outlets for sex workers. But that's not how law enforcement portrays it. They claim to be fighting sex trafficking, which federal law defines as the recruitment, harboring, transportation or obtaining of a person for commercial sex through the use of force, fraud or coercion.
Shortly after the Seattle raids, for instance, Bellevue Police Chief Steve Mylett said that his men, working with the King County Sheriff's office and the FBI, had broken up a "well-organized ring promoting sex slavery." Likewise, the Cook County sheriff called backpage.com a haven for pimps and traffickers.
There's one big problem with that narrative: There's little evidence that these web sites abet sex trafficking. But we do know that shutting them down these makes life more dangerous for sex workers.
The ability to advertise online allows sex workers to more carefully screen potential customers, negotiate safe sex (i.e. sex with condoms), and work indoors. Researchers conclude that when sex workers can't advertise online, they are often forced to work on the street, where they are more likely to encounter violent clients. They also are more likely be dependent on exploitative pimps to find customers.
"Now these women have one less safe advertising venue," Savannah Sly, a Seattle sex worker and president of Sex Workers Outreach Project, said after thereviewboard.net was shuttered. Ditto for the sex workers who advertised on Rentboy.com, myRedbook.com and Backpage.com. "What the removal of these advertising sites do is remove low-risk clients from the client pool," Sly added. "And because you have reduced demand, you're more likely to agree to see the guy who is more dangerous."
That appears to be what happened in Sweden, after that country made it illegal to purchase sex services (but not to provide them) in 2000. Sex workers there were exposed to more violent clients when they lost many of their regular low-risk clients. Transactions with remaining clients also became more rushed, so sex workers had less time and ability to negotiate safe sex and assess potentially dangerous clients.
And in the end, criminalizing sex clients in Sweden actually increased the overall number of sex workers, and did not reduce trafficking in the region at all.
Countries that have decriminalized sex work and regulated it to some degree (such as the Netherlands and New Zealand) also report no increase in the sex trafficking of minors and illegal immigrants. At the same time, sex workers in those countries are better able to protect themselves — from physical harm and sexually transmitted diseases. Because they don't fear police harassment, legalized sex workers are also more comfortable working with police to target traffickers and abusive clients. ...

"A Composer and His Wife: Creativity Through Kink"

on Wednesday, 24 February 2016. Hits 276

The New York Times

By ZACHARY WOOLFE

The OkCupid message Mollena Williams received in December 2013 was, in some ways, standard. It was complimentary: “Wow — your profile is great.” It was confident: “I am an artist, very successful (probably member of the top 10 or 20 in my genre in the world).” It was polite, signing off with “warm wishes.”

 

But something was a bit out of the ordinary, speaking to its author’s interest in domination and submission. The central desire? “I would like to tame you.”

 

The writer was Georg Friedrich Haas, whose powerfully emotional, politically charged music and explorations of microtonality make him one of the world’s leading composers. His work had brought widespread acclaim, but his personal life was troubled, with three failed marriages in his wake, when he met Ms. Williams, a writer and sex educator who specializes in alternative lifestyles. Shortly after he messaged her, the two began a relationship and were married last fall.

 

Composers do their work offstage and largely out of the public eye. But all music is influenced by its makers’ personal lives and, in many cases through history, their grappling with sexuality. Tchaikovsky’s struggle with his homosexuality helped create music of agonizing longing.

 

The Austrian-born Mr. Haas, 62, a music professor at Columbia University since 2013, has recently been increasingly open about the unusual nature of his marriage, which he says has dramatically improved his productivity and reshaped his artistic outlook. He will be the subject of a two-concert American Immersion series on Wednesday and Friday presented by the Austrian Cultural Forum, which includes the American premiere of his “I can’t breathe,” a dirgelike solo trumpet memorial to Eric Garner.

 

In a joint appearance with his wife, who now goes by Mollena Williams-Haas, late last year at the Playground sexuality conference in Toronto, then in an interview this month in the online music magazine VAN, he has “come out,” as he put it, as the dominant figure in a dominant-submissive power dynamic. Mr. Haas has chosen to speak up, both because Ms. Williams-Haas’s sexual interests are widely known (her blog, The Perverted Negress, is not shy about kink and bondage) and because he hopes to embolden younger people, particularly composers, not to smother untraditional urges, as he did.

 

The fundamental feature of their relationship is not obviously sexual, Mr. Haas and Ms. Williams-Haas, 46, said in an interview at their airy apartment near Columbia, with expansive views of the Hudson River. “It’s not caning,” he said. “It’s the fact that I need someone who is with me when I work.”

 

Their marriage can seem, in this regard, distinctly old-fashioned, and not in a Marquis de Sade way. While the terms they negotiated at the start of their relationship do not prevent her from pursuing her own professional and personal life, Ms. Williams-Haas devotes much of her time to supporting the work of a man — “Herr Meister,” she has nicknamed him — for whom a “good day” is one in which he composes for 14 or 15 hours.

 

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“She makes my life as comfortable as possible,” Mr. Haas said.

 

Ms. Williams-Haas, who described the situation as feminist because it is her choice, said, “I find intense fulfillment in being able to serve in this way.”

 

She conceded the discomfort many may feel with a black woman willingly submitting to a white man. “It’s a struggle to say, ‘This is genuinely who I am,’” she said. But she added, “To say I can’t play my personal psychodrama out just because I’m black, that’s racist.”

 

Mr. Haas said that he felt liberated after what he described as a lifetime’s and three divorces’ worth of suppressing what he once considered “devilish” desires. The change has altered his music in ways both quantifiable and more ineffable. He said that his productivity had roughly doubled since meeting Ms. Williams-Haas, which will delight his fans.

 

And while his work has not lost its moody, queasy darkness, he identifies a new hopefulness in it. His 2015 opera “Morgen und Abend,” for example, ends with a scene of a dead father unable to communicate with his living daughter. “Before I met you,” Mr. Haas said to Ms. Williams-Haas, “this end would be very desperate. Now this end is full of ‘Yeah, we have to die, we have to leave, but the life of love still remains.’” (Michael White, writing in The New York Times, called the opera “a serious and sober, though ultimately radiant, imagining of what it might be like to die and pass into another kind of sentience.”)

 

Mr. Haas contrasted the effect on his style to the struggles of Schubert and Tchaikovsky with homosexuality. “What you perceive is not the fact that they desired men,” he said, “but the sadness about the impossibility to make love a reality. And I think that has been part of my music. The fundamental pessimism. You never will get what you want because it’s not possible to get it. That is how my life has changed so intensely.” ...

Latest Reader Comments

  • I am looking forward to being able to hear the recorded sessions from the Consent Summit. So grateful that you were able to do this for...

    Chris

    28. April, 2016 |

  • Thanks for posting your note and calling out to others looking for professional dialogue, networking and resources around serving LGBTQ,...

    Cindy Trawinski, Psy.D.

    28. April, 2016 |

  • This makes a great deal of sense as it fits very much in with foreplay and some very sensual lead up to some excellent mind, body, soul &...

    M.Wryter

    13. April, 2016 |

  • The problem for the judge was that the cpomplainants withheld important relevant information and changed their stories significantly...

    Nancy

    26. March, 2016 |

  • The Center is handling the catering for the Luncheon which features sandwiches and salads during Tristan's Keynote Speech. I also...

    Blog Admin

    24. March, 2016 |

  • It seems to be inferred by the name, but I have to be sure. Is a meal included as pat of the Luncheon? Will vegan or vegetarian options...

    Chase

    23. March, 2016 |