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"Kinky, Single New Yorkers Want Long-term Relationships"

on Saturday, 06 September 2014. Hits 140

Time

Can a survey of one dating app’s users be explained by the Big Apple’s kinkiness?

 

 

More than Chicagoans, more than Houstonians, more than Los Angelenos, single New Yorkers are on the hunt for long-term relationships. (News to us, yes!)

 

 

That’s according to a survey of 15,000 users of the dating app Clover, which matches users with other people nearby who like them (sort of the equivalent of Tinder, but with some added functionalities and without the dreaded accidental left swipe remorse.) The results—which, it must be stressed, are as unscientific as it gets—indicate a stark divide: Thirty-nine percent of New York City (NYC) respondents said they’re looking for a Long Term Relationship (LTR), compared to 27%, 25%, and 22% of those in Chicago, Houston, and LA, respectively.

For denizens of New York City, those results might be met with disbelief. My own experience and a quick survey of friends’ dating lives in New York confirms that, anecdotally at least, we think of New York City as a free-wheeling land of singles and casual sex. In the land of possibility, LTRs are like unicorns: mythical things that few have ever actually seen, which are presumed to be beautiful, yes, but also capable of making you feel like you’ve been trampled by hooves and spiked repeatedly through the gut.

“It can’t be done,” said one woman, when asked about having an LTR.

“I thought those were so 2005,” said another woman.

“Must have car and sailboat,” said another woman. ...

"Man forced wife to sign sex slave contract, tortured and abused her"

on Saturday, 06 September 2014. Hits 342

By Scott Adkins

A 32-year-old Seymour, Indiana man is accused of raping and beating his wife after forcing her to sign a “slave contract,” WFIE-TV reported on Thursday.

Kenneth Eugene Harden is accused of 38 counts of battery, criminal confinement and rape. He reportedly married the woman just over a year ago after meeting through an online personal ad. Harden allegedly described himself as a Christian during their brief courtship, only to reveal six months into the marriage that he was a “sadist.”

According to a police affadavit (PDF), police learned about the conditions Harden imposed on his wife after she called them to their residence on Aug. 30. The woman said Harden choked her with a collar she was required to wear as part of the “contract.” However, she said, Harden continually broke rules in the agreement barring abuse of her.

Authorities also found a “slave manual,” signed by the woman and Harden this past June, and paperwork granting Harden power of attorney for the woman. She told police that despite being abused for months, she could not leave him, in part because she suffered from diabetes and Harden never taught her how to operate her insulin pump.

“This is what I’m supposed to live by, and I’m tired of the abuse,” the woman was quoted as saying. “I’m tired of getting hit every day. Please, I’m scared.”

She also told officers that she would yell while Harden hit her, in hopes a neighbor would call for help.

“We could hear them fighting sometimes and we heard a lot of loud noises upstairs,” downstairs neighbor Tyler Davers was quoted as saying. “But I never thought anything of it.”

Harden is being held on $100,000 bond. ...

NCSF Disappointed with Decision in U.S. v. Miles

on Wednesday, 03 September 2014. Hits 467

Washington, DC – NCSF is disappointed with the decision against Gregory T. Miles, Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, by the Navy-Marine Corps Court of Criminal Appeals, which upheld the convictions of consensual attempted sodomy and indecent acts. As NCSF previously stated in its Amicus brief, accepted by the Court in March, 2014:

 

·       Regarding the “indecent acts” conviction (Article 120(k)), the Court ignores the fact that this provision is explicitly, on its face, inconsistent with the Supreme Court’s holding in Lawrence v. Texas that a criminal statute cannot be predicated on moral disapproval, but rather must protect a legitimate societal interest.  Article 120(k)’s definition of “indecent acts” is specifically keyed to moral disapproval.

 

·       The court’s analysis of the Lawrence treatment of sodomy is incorrect. The issue is not whether Lawrence made sodomy a “fundamental right,” the issue is whether sodomy can be criminally prosecuted, a very different thing.

 

·       Also, to equate “open and notorious” with Lawrence’s use of the word “public” is to play with words.  As demonstrated in the NCSF Amicus brief, the Supreme Court’s statement that Lawrence does not deal with “public conduct” cannot rationally be read to mean that commission of sodomy in public can be prosecuted as sodomy (as opposed to, say, public lewdness).

 

·       Lastly, the Court’s statements on the forcible conduct charges are simply astonishing: “acquittal on criminal charges does not prove that the defendant is innocent; it merely proves the existence of a reasonable doubt as to his guilt.”

 

Despite this defeat, NCSF remains committed to supporting the decision made in Lawrence and will continue to fight against moral interpretations of the law.

"Dream of the Nineties: Cafe con Lechery"

on Wednesday, 03 September 2014. Hits 318

by Siouxsie Q

When I was a young queer, my local coffee shop was crucial to my existence. The coffee wasn't important; it was the community there that mattered. It was the place I took my first girlfriends on dates and the place I played music in front of an audience for the first time. But in the late 1990s, the coffee culture shifted toward national chain stores, and the small community shops started to disappear.

Despite the decline of mom-and-pop coffee shops, kinky San Francisco transplants Ryan Galiotto and his wife decided to assume the risk of opening one in 2009. But they wanted it to be different from the Chicago shops they had frequented in the early '90s: They wanted to create a place that would cater to the local kink, Leather, and fetish communities. And thus, Wicked Grounds, America's first kink café and boutique, was born. Galiotto describes it as a place where "people don't have to worry about saying the word 'dildo' and offending the soccer mom at the next table," a place where one can kneel to lap up a latte from a dog bowl or enjoy a freshly made waffle inside a cage. Located in the heart of SOMA at Eighth and Folsom streets, the café follows in the footsteps of other kinky businesses that have made their homes in the neighborhood. Though Wicked Grounds has a vibrant community of kinksters who frequent the shop for weekly gatherings called "munches," the place has had a rocky five years — financial hardships, changes in ownership, and even divorce. Galiotto has experienced firsthand the challenges of owning a brick-and-mortar business in this city, sometimes working over 60 hours a week as barista, bookkeeper, and manager. His commitment to the café is unwavering, and he is the first to admit that it is a nostalgic labor of love.

Asked why he has devoted his life to this quirky little coffee shop that sells sex toys and has pictures of naked women in bondage on the walls, he responded with a story about a long-running event at the café, the monthly Littles Munch.

At the Littles Munch, adults who like to engage in age-related role-play socialize, color in coloring books, wear onesies, and drink milkshakes. Galiotto's eyes light up as he recounts the tale: "Early on in the Littles Munch, there was a guy in his 50s, professional, went to work in a suit and tie every day. [When he] came home, he'd switch to a onesie, watch cartoons, and eat his cereal. He heard about us, came and checked out the Littles Munch. He sat at a table away from it, watching it, and eventually felt comfortable enough to go to the bathroom, change into his onesie and join the party." Galiotto wants do more than serve coffee to people in leather; he wants to provide a space to "help people come out of their kinky closets." ...

"Anti-kink and transphobia have no place in Paganism"

on Tuesday, 02 September 2014. Hits 341

Patheos

by Yvonne Aburrow

 

Z Budapest’s latest hate-filled screed makes me really angry.

[Update: actual link to actual comment]

It was feminists like Budapest who made it hard for people, especially feminists, to come out as kinky in the seventies, eighties, and nineties. With their statements that you are a failure as a feminist if you engage in kink, especially dominance and submission play, they made a lot of kinky feminists feel alone, marginalised, and ashamed. It is hard enough to come to terms with being kinky in the prevailing culture without having your own communities attacking you. People in kink-excluding communities, who have to remain in the closet, live in fear of being exposed as kinky, and feel marginalised, alone, and attacked. Their membership of the community feels conditional upon not coming out as kinky. Endless research studies have shown how damaging it is for LGBT people to remain closeted – surely the same applies to kinksters?

Similarly, the biologically essentialist view of being a woman held by many second-wave feminists made it very hard for those who are gender-variant. Their rhetoric about all penetrative sex being rape obfuscated the issues around rape, made things difficult for lesbians who enjoy penetration, and for heterosexual and bisexual women who enjoy sex with men. Even other lesbians in relationships were attacked for “aping men”.

This is in spite of the fact that kinksters have been part of the queer liberation movement from the outset. In spite of the fact that the BDSM community is very strong on consent (obviously there are some who don’t walk the talk, but that is the case in all communities). The watchwords of kinksters are ‘Safe, Sane, and Consensual’.

The power play in kink involving dominance and submission (D/s) subverts and undermines the power dynamics of conventional power structures. Many people find the role-play aspects of BDSM liberating. All the women I know who are involved in D/s (whether dommes or subs) are powerful women in their own right. And D/s has very little to do with gender, in any case.

The use of pain as a tool for spiritual and psychological transformation is an ancient shamanistic practice, and its effects – psychological, spiritual, and biochemical – are well-understood. There is a reasonable amount of research on this.

In addition, various therapists have written on the psychological aspects of kink, and why it is not harmful for those who enjoy it.

I would argue that kink, polyamory, and monogamy are sexual orientations in the same way as homosexuality, heterosexuality, bisexuality, and pansexuality. That means that for a kinky person to try not to be kinky is just as painful and impossible as for a gay person to try to be straight. ...

Guest Blog: A Counselor's first Experience Working with a Poly Family

on Saturday, 30 August 2014. Hits 1134

By Eric Jett, NCC, LPC


Working crisis intervention with adolescents was an area as a counselor I grew to love because of the diversity of clients I would get to interact with on a daily basis. Several years ago my passion for working with children and the area of crisis/trauma would open a new door for my professional and personal awareness. I had the opportunity to work with a young teen from a family who was struggling with what as a counselor I would expect to see in a teenage boy starting middle school, identity issues, bullying, and the usual horrible experience so many teens sadly go through.

However part of my counseling experience has shown that developing a support system is vital when working with children and teens, which is why family therapy is a necessity. During the first intake, we had gone over the typical counseling questions and discussed the importance of family counseling that we start after a couple of individual sessions between me and their son. Mom and Dad were extremely cordial about the process, extremely concerned about their son, and you could see their investment in helping him grow and survive this situation; yet something was still off. There was something mom and dad were holding back, and I could tell they were not ready to bridge that conversation yet.

So what did I do as a counselor? I left it alone. My therapeutic approach to counseling understands that this is a process where the client has to take the lead sometimes. When you work with children and adolescents he or she may be the primary client but the family is the overall client. After all they act as the support in creating environmental changes to help the kid or teen.

As time grew closer for our first family meeting the mother of my client called and asked if her and her husband could meet with me to discuss something important about their family. Now as a counselor at this point I had worked with many diverse families and as a counselor, my experience has always been there is more to learn from my clients then my client can learn from me. One of the first questions the parents asked me during our meeting with just the three of us was what I was required to report to the state about child abuse. As a counselor, this is not usually something you want to hear because you know the time that is going to be involved in having to make a report; however as a counselor who specializes in children and teens it comes with the job responsibilities.

I reminded the parents of the informed consent which we covered during the initial intake that I was required to report any suspicions of child abuse by state law. The questions that followed were similar to that of an academic inquiry on what was considered child abuse within our state. I will admit this had me concerned, and my direct approach was to ask “do you believe your son has been physical, sexually, or emotionally abused in some way?” The mom and dad instantly went to denying any occurrence of abuse, and I admittedly told them I was a little confused about their concern on the child abuse reporting laws for our state.

Dads’ response was “we are polyamorous.” I had in my personal experiences learned about polyamory and fortunately knew through some great resources the terminology; however, I value the importance of report building with my clients, and I wanted to continue building trust with my clients’ family. It was also important to understand what polyamory meant to this family. I was aware that poly can mean and look different to individuals and family units. For the remainder of the hour, we talked about their amazing family which included six adults who their son and other 3 children got to refer to as parents. Mom and dad’s greatest fear was that as a professional, this would be reportable, and they could have their children taken away from them because their life views are one of growth of love among the family unit. Our next family session all 6 adults attended, and it became very apparent to me as a counselor the opportunities we had to work really as an amazing support structure for this teen and help him through this difficult time of his life.

While this is a very short account of my beginning experience working with poly families which I have continued to work with over the past several years, this particular family and several others. However as a counselor it was an important learning experience to remind me the fear and concern which can often be with individuals because of societal expectations. If my life is outside of what society wants what does that mean for me? For my family? For my children?

I also am reminded that there is a need to acknowledge our clients as the experts in what is occurring in their life. This family had lived as a family unit, with their ups and downs, like every relationship for the span of over 20 years before stepping into my office. My job is that of acceptance and protection. There was no harm occurring within the family and if anything this family was making something that “society” driven relationship between two individuals often struggle doing. But as a counselor I had to be willing to learn.

I worked with the family for over a year and during that course of time they educated me on not only their family but resources, books, articles, and even polyamorous meetups in the area with other families and individuals interested in relationships. I had to be willing to grow and because of that and this particular family I believe I am not only a better professional but individual because I stepped outside of my box.

Communication is important, as a professional, as an individual, and as someone considering going to a professional for guidance. We should not be afraid to talk to our professionals about our lifestyles, and likewise as professionals we shouldn’t be afraid to listen to our clients about their lifestyles. We need to advocate continued expression and freedom because we hold the balance in making it “ok” and not a big deal.

I have been pleased and amazed to be able to present this particular client case to colleagues in past trainings who in the beginning struggle with the idea of working with a poly family and often I see many skewed views of what this means for the family and children. However, after we talk about and demonstrate the work we were able to do in family therapy and how the family having multiple parents actually strengthened my work with the teen, colleagues often leave with a changed view. As a professional that gives me hope and I appreciated for the opportunity this particular family had given me to work within the poly community as a counselor.

 

"My ‘Kink’ Nightmare: James Franco’s BDSM Porn Documentary ‘Kink’ Only Tells Part of the Story"

on Saturday, 30 August 2014. Hits 523

The Daily Beast

by

The James Franco-produced documentary Kink, which provides a glowing portrait of the BDSM porn site Kink.com, is now in theaters. But for some performers, working for Kink can be terrifying.

“WHORE.”

Her cold, thin fingers wrapped around my jaw like a Vise-Grip. I could feel the fat of my cheeks trying to escape as she held me still to mark me with red lipstick. There I stood, stripped down to nothing but the chafing rope that bound my wrists together and the smudged letters on my forehead: WHORE. I was to be her slave, literally.

It was late in my career and I was already famous with hundreds of movies under my belt, but nothing like this. I’d shied away from the BDSM culture. It scared me. Despite signing paperwork and a checklist of dos and don'ts, I was in way over my head. What I thought I was agreeing to felt a lot different in reality. I was groped by hands I didn't know. There were masked people everywhere, but only the ones wearing wristbands were my approved scene partners. If I balked at an act or found it difficult to perform, I was “punished” for my defiance (which is the nature of a BDSM scene). It felt more like a party for the extras than a professional scene. Experienced as I was, it was new to me. I’d never used a safe word before (and forgot to), so when things became too much to bear and I began protesting, no one listened. The word “No” doesn't work in these types of scenes.

I met my breaking point in this particular scene—halfway through, I had to be untied and calmed down. I was shaking. I felt a catch in my throat when I tried to speak and I could barely keep the tears at bay. I felt like I’d been beat. Yet I was hugged, inundated with compliments, and told how strong I was for being on the receiving end. I was caned, electrically prodded, and slapped around. I didn't feel powerful. In the interim, I had to decide whether I was going to quit or be a professional and finish the scene. After everything I'd gone through, leaving would have made it worthless. So I stayed.

After the scene, I did a brief on camera interview about my experience—a standard company procedure. I nodded my head, smiled, and said all the right things. To me, that interview was also part of the job. It’s also filmed before performers are paid, or at least that's been my experience.

After watching an intense scene that will make your eyes water, it's reassuring to see an interview stating that everyone had a good time. It's that kind of feel-good integrity that Kink.com, one of the most successful BDSM (bondage, dominance, submission, and sadomasochism) porn companies works hard to promote. It's a fascinating company that operates out of the historic San Francisco Armory, offering a variety of productions, tours, live shows, and kinky parties on the upper floor. I can't think of another XXX company quite as diverse or dark that's also so commercially successful. ...

"Pornhub Study: Isolated Loners of Wyoming, Alaska Love Bondage Porn"

on Thursday, 28 August 2014. Hits 297

Maybe it's just the cold, clean mountain air.

BetaBeat

by By Jack Smith IV

Next time you’re on a trip to a romantic mountain getaway, a ski vacation, or just a trip to that little cabin in the woods, don’t forget the bondage tape, ball gag and OhMiBod. Turns out, people in remote areas are way more curious about bondage than those of us who live in cities and suburbs.

Pornhub Insights, the blog that looks at porn browsing habits to produce such revelations as “America Runs On Anal,” dug into the search terms surrounding BDSM porn. Though bondage accounts for less than two percent of searches — which seems low to us — Americans are clearly curious about dom/sub relationships, if the popularity of 50 Shades of Grey is any indicator.

The blog post has an interactive heat map that shows which states are searching for the above BDSM terms most often. As it turns out, the states most interested in bondage also happen to be states with extremely low population densities, like Wyoming, Oregon and Alaska. This suggests a possible link between sparse populations and an interest in butt plugs, blindfolds and patient restraints.

The correlation isn’t statistically perfect. After all, a couple of states like Nebraska and New Mexico escape the top ten of the bondage-obsessed. Still, states where people live shoulder to shoulder are notably less inclined to go searching for “latex” and “punish.” ...

 

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