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International Media Update: "Dominatrix who chained, gagged and whipped her clients in a sex dungeon is beaten by Health and Safety chiefs... over fire laws"

on Monday, 17 March 2014. Hits 315

Daily Mail

by By Ted Thornhill

A dominatrix who whipped cross-dressing men while they were chained up and gagged has been fined for a serious breach of health and safety rules.

But it’s nothing to do with the way she physically treated her clients.

Lorraine White, 41, was fined £8,000 for breaching fire safety rules at her Stockport sex dungeon.

Magistrates heard how the firemen were unable to get into the building after a blaze broke out there.

Once they finally did gain access they found a trove of handcuffs, chains and other restraining devices in the basement.

Crews were called to the building on Vauxhall industrial estate, Greg Street, on October 30, 2012 after a maintenance man reported a basement fire.

They struggled to gain access to the Medusa club due to the locked doors but eventually they managed to enter and discovered the sex dungeon.

The fire had been sparked by a leaking gas heater.

When questioned, White admitted she had no idea she was responsible for fire safety arrangements.
There was only one manually operated fire alarm and one fire exit was permanently locked.

Fire investigators found several canisters of nitrous oxide, laughing gas - also know as 'hippie crack' - which White’s clients used to get high. Elizabeth Dudley-Jones, prosecuting, said: ‘She was asked what would happen if there was a fire when her clients were under the influence of the gas and restrained.

‘She said she had not considered it.’

Ms Dudley-Jones said White was asked about the activities in the club. ‘She said nothing was too severe. Slight bondage, possibly a mask or gag. It involved a lot of humiliation, doing domestic work and dressing up in women’s clothes.’

White, a former beautician, from Chaseley Road, Salford, pleaded guilty to four charges of fire safety rules, including failing to carry out a risk assessment, install suitable fire alarms, maintain emergency exits, or install emergency lighting.

She was fined £5,000 for the offences and ordered to pay £3,000 costs and a £120 victim charge.

White, who earns £1,100 a month from the business and spent £10,000 refurbishing her smoke-damaged dungeon, agreed to pay the sum at £100-a-month. ...

"Bondage enthusiasts getting tied up in BDSM, Shibari"

on Thursday, 13 March 2014. Hits 286

Metro

By Edward Thompson

People are more tied up than ever these days, and we’re not talking about the pace of life — oh no, Metro’s referring to bondage.

The sexually active and liberal are getting into knots over BDSM (Bondage & Discipline, Dominance & Submission, Sadism and Masochism) and Shibari. Bruce Esinem, a London-based expert in shibari (Japanese rope bondage), explains why the public will be gagging to get involved in restraint.

Metro: Have books like “Fifty Shades of Grey” made people more sexually adventurous?

Esinem: I think it’s kicked off an interest. It’s been good for business because it brought the whole BDSM thing out of the shadows. Attitudes are changing a lot: it’s a bit like where the gay scene was a few decades back when people misunderstood the culture and created all sorts of incorrect stereotypes.

So, what are those false stereotypes about BDSM?

It used to be considered a freak show where the media would roll out the stupidest kink with the most unappealing people. I think when you mention certain things, people have an immediate reaction and the man in the street thinks whips and chains and gimp masks. They’ll think about the secretary tied to the office chair with shiny white nylon rope or the girl next door hog-tied in some tacky hotel room. When there is an incident that involves some sadistic criminal act, it then gets termed BDSM, which is somewhat ridiculous because BDSM is about consent. It’s like comparing rape to consensual sex.

What are the dangers with shibari?

There are certain stupid things that people can do. Tying people up and leaving them alone is like using a hairdryer in the shower. One of the dangers of leaving people tied up in a stress position is that it can cause positional asphyxia. That’s when your breathing muscles get tired and you can’t breathe anymore.

What’s the most extreme thing in shibari?

Some of the rope suspension is quite intense and not comfortable. People go through the pain barrier as they do with a lot of physical activities and then get the endorphin high from it. People aren’t doing it because they’re crazy – it’s because they enjoy the experience. It can be anything from soft, fluffy and sensual from the embrace and sensuality of the rope moving across the skin, to the rope stimulating the erogenous zones. It kicks off the endorphins like any other pain or stress. ...

tp://www.metro.us/newyork/lifestyle/sex-lifestyle/2014/03/12/bondage-enthusiasts-getting-tied-bdsm-shibari/#sthash.cewEOghf.dpuf

 

International Media Update: "Whips and chains excite me: Inside the kinky world of BDSM in Lebanon"

on Thursday, 13 March 2014. Hits 173

Albawaba

Sitting outside a coffee shop in Sassine, Ziad gestures to himself and says, “Look at me. Who could guess I like to whip women? ”It’s a fair question, like other members of the clandestine Lebanese BDSM community with whom the Daily Star spoke, Ziad comes across as an average, middle-aged guy, the kind you’d expect to see at the office or chain smoking in a cafe. Human sexuality comes up in ordinary conversation often, but BDSM – an umbrella term for bondage, dominance, submission, sadism and masochism – is not a sexual preference many understand.

Rarely addressed in the mainstream – though the explosive success of novels such as “Fifty Shades of Grey” suggests change – its practitioners often face stigma.

Some in the Lebanese community have responded to the stigma by banding together for regular meetings starting in September 2011.

“We’ve built this group as a way to be there for newbies ... to try and promote awareness for anybody who wished to listen,” says Hadi, a group founder and a “master,” meaning he prefers to play the dominant role.

The group counts about 10 members, all of whom reside in Lebanon. They hold a “munch” once a month to chat and have a drink, just like any group of friends.

“A lot of people have been reticent to join us, they somehow believe we’ve got big stickers on our heads that say who we are,” says Charlotte, a Canadian “sub,” or submissive partner. Topics discussed can range from the banal – such as where to find a good dentist – to more BDSM specific – such as where to buy good bondage rope.

SAFETY FIRST

While there are a wealth of different practices that fall under the BDSM umbrella, one unifying characteristic is safety.

Hadi, who was trained as a master at the Black Lotus Academy in Paris and can teach others professionally, explains that different people are interested in different kinks, which can range from role playing or the use of collars, whips, canes and floggers, to the more extreme, such as burning. He even knows one man who “enjoys being beaten. ... That’s what gets him off.”

Whatever the fetish, there are two key things: safety and consent.

“There are ways to do it safely, as not to leave marks if the person doesn’t want marks, and if the person wants marks, there are ways not to do any damage,” Hadi says.

What is striking about the BDSM scene is the communication. Not just on the communal level, but also between couples in a relationship, such as Charlotte and Ziad.

For Charlotte, exploring her limits with Ziad was an awakening. She first came across BDSM in her early 20s. The man she was dating at the time tied her up, cut her with a razor and made her stand in the corner, though at the time she was unaware these were sexual behaviors that would fall under the BDSM classification. All she knew was “this was part of who this man was” and she liked it, she says.

It wasn’t until she became involved in the BDSM scene in Lebanon, and became Ziad’s play partner and submissive, that she finally began to understand this part of herself. Ziad gave Charlotte an extensive list of kinks for her to explore so that she could determine her limits.

Their relationship is characteristic of the BDSM scene, where partnerships usually form between dominants and submissives. It’s not an unusual concept; in most human relationships, there is a power play between those in control and those controlled. What BDSM does is to formalize this dynamic in a way that gives both ends of the spectrum satisfaction sexually.

What it doesn’t mean, however, is that the dominant has free reign.

“The important [thing] is the constant communication between both sides, the dom cannot do as he pleases,” Hadi explains.

It is a misconception that concerns many, “I’ve seen so many sub men and woman who think they have to put up with s--t,” Charlotte says.

But when done right, BDSM can lead to intense pleasure. While for many the idea of giving up control might seem foreign or even frightening, for submissives, the loss of control can be euphoric. The community has given this pleasure a name: “subspace.” ...

"Hey, Ann Coulter! Did you hear about the kinky Stanford students?"

on Monday, 10 March 2014. Hits 275

In an exclusive conversation with Salon, Stanford's kinksters talk about seeking university approval

Salon

by

 

The bad news came in late February. An application to have Stanford University officially recognize a 60-member student kink club was rejected — for now. In an email, a representative for the  Student Organization Review Committee, which is made up of students and staff, wrote that they ”liked the concept of your proposal but did not feel that as submitted it sufficiently met the criteria for a new student organization.” She encouraged the group to apply again next quarter with a revised proposal.

“We’re disappointed, but we’re not surprised,” said “Jon,” a Stanford junior and member of the group, Kardinal Kink, which was started in April of last year. When asked why they weren’t surprised by the rejection, Lily Z., the club’s president, explained in an email, “We’re not surprised by the culture we live in. Our society is a place where kink is expected to be rejected, expected to be pushed back down when it comes up — and Stanford is no exception.” In another email, Jon argued that they were “rejecting us as a group for the same reasons LGBT-type groups were getting rejected a few decades ago.”

When I contacted Nanci Howe, associate dean of students, she expressed surprise to be hearing from a reporter, as “the students are still in the process of applying to be a student group.” There are three responses to applications, she said: They are accepted, told to re-apply or rejected. “It’s common for groups to be asked for more detail about their proposal,” she said. “The majority of groups that provide additional information become recognized student groups.”

So, Stanford is hardly taking a hard line against kink. In fact, a kink lecture series has already been allowed on campus. But the students feel that their application was held to higher standards because of the taboo nature of their club.

Lily shared the committee’s email with Salon, along with rebuttals for each point. The committee requested “better clarity about the scope of your group, especially in regards to clarity about your group’s hoped for activities.” She says the application made that clear in its first sentence, which read, “Kardinal Kink is both a support group and an advocacy group: a supportive anonymous space for Stanford students to explore kink themes safely and a public effort to campaign for resources, research, and respect for kink by promoting a positive and accurate understanding of kink sexuality on campus.”

Imagining the university’s worst fear, I asked whether their “hoped for activities” included, well, nudity or sex. “Absolutely not. No nudity, no sexual contact,” said “Helena,” a Stanford sophomore and founder of Kardinal Kink. “These are discussion groups, they’re support groups. There are lots of support groups on campus and this is just another one.” Kardinal Kink also features guest lecturers. “We have well-known educators who have put their lives toward trying to educate people about sexuality and communication, come to campus … and teach us these skills that 20-year-olds may not be able to teach to each other,” she explains.

As Jon put it, ”I don’t think that the educational source for kink should be ‘Fifty Shades of Grey.’ I think it should be well-informed professionals and like-minded people that come together to educate.”

The committee’s email also asked that the group “find an experienced staff advisor who can … regularly work [with] you and your leadership, assisting you in developing best practices for your activities.” Lily argues, “This is not a requirement for Student Organizations” — indeed, a staff adviser is not listed as official criteria for approval — “it’s just a hoop to jump through.” She added, “They think it’s going to be nigh impossible to find faculty ready to ascribe their name to a Kink student group, hence why they put this out there.” The email also suggests they “propose a name that is more in line with your group proposal,” and ”develop a risk management plan for your group and its activities,” which Lily calls “ambiguous” and “not a requirement.”

There is plenty of precedent for schools recognizing such clubs, even at Ivy Leagues like Princeton, Columbia, Yale and Harvard. So too is there precedent for controversy.

In 2012, Harvard officially recognized its group of 30 students who met to discuss issues relating to kinky sex. The decision made international headlines. The Daily Mail wrote, “A Harvard student group that relishes in conversations about erotic sex has been officially recognized by the prestigious university.” Relishes in conversations about erotic sex? Not exactly. The group’s constitution states that it “exists to promote a positive and accurate understanding of kinky sexuality on campus, as well as to create a space where students may feel accepted in their own sexuality” and “creates a space where students may discuss problems in their own relationships, up to and including abuse and assault.” How debauched. ...

"‘Ethical Slut’ launches second YouTube season"

on Sunday, 09 March 2014. Hits 263

Wisconsin Gazette

 

Why is it OK, and even complimentary, to refer to a man with many sexual conquests as a “stud,” while promiscuous women are labeled “slut”?

The question has long interested Madison-born actor and filmmaker Ben Fritz. It drives the philosophy and narratives behind The Ethical Slut, Fritz’s Web-based series that soon launches its second season.

Based on the 1997 book The Ethical Slut: A Guide to Infinite Sexual Possibilities by lesbian authors Dossie Easton and Janet Hardy (then writing under the name Catherine A. Liszt), the series focuses on two female friends exploring the concept of polyamory, the idea of having multiple intimate or sexual relationships at the same time with the consent of everyone involved. The authors sought to reclaim the word “slut” as an empowering feminist term.

Season One’s 12 episodes, each from 5 to 8 minutes long, explore different aspects of the concept. They’re meant for bite-sized consumption by busy viewers. Despite the title, the Web series is more PG-13 than R-rated — something that Fritz believes captures the authors’ philosophy.

“What drew me (to the book) were concepts of open communications and emotional responsibility,” said Fritz, a Monona native whose acting experiences range from episodes of the TV series Friends to a Madison production of Terrence McNally’s Corpus Christi in which he played Judas Iscariot.

“I’m also interested in how people structure their lives and make it work,” Fritz adds. “They try to do it in ways that make them feel free, and the characters in the series do so through sexual freedom.”

Fritz spent time as part of the Los Ange- les filmmaking scene, appearing in front of and behind the camera for several independent productions. He acquired the rights to The Ethical Slut book and was in the process of negotiating a series with HBO when it became clear that the cable network planned to go in its own direction without him — and with an emphasis on sensationalizing the book’s sexuality. That approach didn’t fit with the authors’ vision, and the deal eventually was scuttled.

At that point, an independent production seemed the way to go, Fritz says.

“I eventually decided I wanted to make it myself, because I wanted to create some- thing that didn’t exploit people’s smallness,” he says.

Fritz chose his hometown of Madison, partly because of the contacts and resources he had there, but also to prove that polyamory is a concept that can be embraced by middle America.

With a blended L.A. and local cast and crew, Season One is so Madison-centric that it could be a chamber of commerce video — if not for the sexual theme. Characters shop at the Willy Street Co-op, play at Keva Sports Center, visit Ale Asylum Brewery and work out at A Perfect Knot Yoga Center. Shots of the Capitol Dome at all times of day and night dominate the visuals. ...

"Principal apologizes for speaker, ID'd as swinger guru"

on Saturday, 08 March 2014. Hits 205

Philly.com

by Ellen Babay

Upper Dublin school officials are apologizing for not having fully vetted the background of a self-billed “life coach” whose past came to light when students started searching his name online during an assembly at which he spoke.

Turns out, the speaker, Jason C. Jean once ran “the ultimate swingers vacation” website.

The message by Principal Robert Schultz was sent to parents and guardians and cited “a number of concerns” that were raised about Thursday’s assembly for 11th- and 12th-grade students at the high school, as well as about “the credentials and background of the speaker.”

The speaker addressed some seniors last year, the principal said, and was invited back to meet with a larger group based on “very positive reviews of that gathering."

In an email, Schultz declined to comment beyond the listserv message. He did not name the speaker. A phone call to Upper Dublin School District headquarters wasn't returned.

But students and social media posts identified the speaker as Jean, a central Pennsylvania motivational speaker.

Jean -- whose website and Tumblr page show a photograph from an event at the high school last May -- confirmed he spoke at the school this week.

In an email Saturday, Jean said he was "unaware" of any issues with the assembly until he saw news reports about the apology.

In the wake of Thursday’s event, questions about Jean’s past have risen. He is the founder of SwingFest, which the event’s website calls “the ultimate swingers vacation for adult couples and singles looking to get away for some sexy adult fun.”

Upper Dublin High School senior Amanda Willis, who attended the event, called Jean “a terrible speaker.”

“He was talking about how he played football for Penn State and that he was drafted into the Phillies at age 16, and that he owned a pasta sauce company and various night clubs,” Willis said.

It was Jean’s mention of pasta sauce that spurred Willis and a friend to Google the self-proclaimed life coach. They wanted to know what company he helmed.

But the results went beyond Bolognese or red gravy. They found an unflattering portrait of him on one blog post.

“We posted it on Twitter during the assembly,” Willis said. “Heads started shooting up and looking around. And they retweeted and retweeted.”

The most Jean touched on his past during the speech was a mention of getting suspended from school for drinking at the age of 14, according to Willis. In fact, “he said he used to drink a lot in high school and said we should call our parents when we were drunk," Willis said.

Indeed, a quick Internet search, as well as Jean’s own website, suggests his background may be somewhat more colorful.

Jean appears to have been highly active in the adult-entertainment industry, described in a Playboy Radio press release as the “King of Swing” and giving a “Swinging 101” interview to Miami.com in 2009. ...

Guest Blog: Polyamory As Orientation?

on Saturday, 08 March 2014. Hits 280

By Race Bannon

In a recent article in Modern Poly written by Saul-of-Hearts, a writer, musician and videographer based in Los Angeles and Portland, the idea that polyamory is an orientation, at least for the writer, was put forth. I posted the article titled “Polyamory As Orientation (And Why It Works For Me)” on Facebook and asked my online friends this question: “So what do you think? Is it similar to an orientation or not?”

The range of answers I got was interesting as discussions regarding polyamory often are, especially with my online friends who range from actively polyamorous to staunchly monogamous and everything in between. But one comment stood out and resonated with me the moment I read it. A friend offered this:

The writer assumes that all humans are not naturally capable of a romantic relationship with more than one individual. I don’t like the term poly. Most research into modern hunter/gatherer societies has shown that monogamy is a modern phenomenon and socially constructed for the purposes of property management and inheritance.

Monogamy isn’t an orientation, it’s conditioning.

Poly isn’t an orientation. It is our natural state.

This rings true for me. I also think being poly is our natural state and that monogamy has been imposed upon us by social conditioning. If you read heralded books like Sex at Dawn: How We Mate, Why We Stray, and What It Means for Modern Relationships, they offer the same conclusion. Of course, this position is controversial for many.

But for those of us who identify as poly and who live a poly life now, or have aspirations to do so, I think adopting the mindset that being poly is a natural state while monogamy is not would serve us well. However, the only caution I would offer is that this stance should not denigrate the decision that some will make to configure their relationships in a monogamous fashion. Just because we might put forth the notion that poly is a natural state does not mean that someone’s choice to be monogamous is wrong or counter to nature, especially if that decision is truly made for reasons that work for the individuals involved and are not the result of social conditioning that makes those people miserable as they try to conform. Poly folks must always value the monogamous among us even as we live our lives in a different fashion. Diversity is the norm and therefore that means that people will decide to configure their relationships in diverse ways also. It’s all good.

With all that said, I guess the most accurate statement I can make is that poly is natural for many people. I contend it’s natural for most people, but the real point I want to make is that it’s most certainly just as natural as monogamy is and perhaps, if social conditioning weren’t a factor, might indeed by the more prevalent form of how we do relationships.

So while I don’t think of myself being polyamorous as an orientation, I do embrace the notion that my poly life is indeed a natural state. It’s certainly more natural for me than monogamy, both in terms of my sexuality and how I bond with others.

Let me know your thoughts about this by posting a comment.

International Media Update: "What one family looks like today: Three partners and kids under one roof"

on Friday, 07 March 2014. Hits 242

Globe and Mail

by Leah McLaren

I n many ways, Catherine Skinner is a typical stay-at-home mom.

The 37-year-old former actress lives with her family on a 30-acre farm in rural Ontario where she spends her days cooking, knitting and caring for three children.

She even has a mommy blog (playboymommy.com) on which she shares her housekeeping tips and photos of herself cooking in a pencil skirt like ones worn by the housewives of Mad Men.

But there is one aspect of Skinner’s life that is far from regular: Her family is polyamorous. The man she calls her husband, Nekky Jamal (37), also has a legal wife, Sarah (41).

For the past five years, since moving in with the family, Skinner has been a full partner and spouse to both of them, as well as an adopted mother to their two biological daughters, aged 8 and 10. A year and a half ago ago, she gave birth to a son, who is growing up, like his sisters, with two moms and a dad.

“What I tell the kids is that we have a unique and special family,” she says.

“Not everyone will appreciate it, and some people will be fearful of it, but to us if feels like the most natural, normal thing in the world.”

The Jamal-Skinners are part of a small but noteworthy number of families who are making the choice to raise their children in polyamorous partnerships involving three people or more. Call them bopos (bourgeois polyamorous) or polyfidelitous (the more academic term), they are the most conventional members of the “poly” sub-culture, a group that includes everything from orgy-obsessed swingers to S&M enthusiasts.

Like many polyfidelitous families, the Jamal-Skinners lead conventional lives outside of their domestic partnership. Educated, affluent, socially liberal professionals (Nekky is an eco-business consultant and Sarah is a business analyst at York University), they believe in political tolerance, private education and shielding their kids from too much TV. They do not have outside lovers, or go to sex clubs, or wear PVC clothing. As Nekky describes it, “We’re not trying to promote a particular lifestyle. We’re just adults who made a grown-up decision to raise our family a different way.”

There are no hard statistics on the number of poly families, and few polyamorists are as “out” as the Jamal-Skinners. But academic researchers estimate that anywhere from 3 to 5 per cent of the North American population engages in some kind of consensual non-monogamy.

While still uncommon, poly families have at least become more noticeable. Polyamory has been the subject of several new books in recent years. Last summer, American writer Angi Becker Stevens, wrote about life with her daughter and two male partners in a Salon essay titled My Two Husbands. The popular parenting blog Mommyish.com has a regular column penned by an anonymous writer called Polyamorous Mom. On Pinterest boards devoted to poly family life, devotees can post pictures of themselves and their spouses cuddled up in king-sized beds.

To some, polyamory is the final frontier in the battle for sexual tolerance – a fight that started with the rise of feminism and still rages in the debate over gay marriage. And their hope is that, just as society has gradually come to respect the rights of transgendered, gay and bisexual people, so too will it eventually accept the rights of people who choose to live together consensually as spouses. ...

Latest Reader Comments

  • This seems to me like it was a BSDM arrangement, which explains why she kept going to work and then went back to the apt. That said, even...

    luisa

    22. February, 2011 |

  • This is a right sentence. How could you fail to share your condition in this situation. You left all these people without any choice.

    John

    23. January, 2011 |

  • Taking pictures with one of her own graduate students wasn't the most bright move.

    Inferno

    22. September, 2010 |

  • We chose polyamory because love could not be denied.

    twowives

    27. August, 2010 |

  • [...] (That link is not remotely work-safe.) I’ve never been, but I surely will someday! And the National Coalition for Sexual...
  • We loved the ethical slut! Great Book!

    Fellow Swingers

    06. July, 2010 |